Music Blog

Jungle + Elegance: America’s Gift to the World

Reflections on Music, Especially Jazz

Jungle + Elegance

The Duke Ellington Orchestra performs Take the A Train with singer Bette Roche in the film Reveille with Beverly, released January 1943. The Duke and I Friday, May 24, 1974. As usual, while making dinner in our small kitchen in our grad school housing apartment at the University of Cincinnati, we turned on National Public …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, Chemistry and Recognition vi (the polls, the songs)

<continuation of previous post and completion of ‘Chemistry and Recognition’> Hallelujah! The Polls In my Trip through Harrell-land so far, I have listened to and reported on much of Harrell’s recorded music from the earliest LPs in the late 60s to the LPs and CDs through the mid-90s. My most recent “Chemistry and Recognition” posts …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, Chemistry and Recognition v (voice, ensemble)

<continuation of previous post> “It’s so mysterious.” “It reads like a composition in and of itself.” Ha + Vo Given the stylistic breadth and emotional depth of his trumpet playing, it comes as no surprise that Tom Harrell was in great demand by vocalists. I have only recently perused KG systematically for his albums with …

Tom Harrell, a Quest. Part 1, Chemistry and Recognition iv (bass, drums, vibes)

<continuation of previous post> Plucked, picked, beaten, struck Ha + B Bassist Bill Crow in his book Jazz Anecdotes passes this one along: Deep in the African jungle, a safari was camped for the night. In the darkness, distant drums began a relentless throbbing that continued until dawn. The safari members were disturbed, but the …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, Chemistry and Recognition iii (guitar, piano)

<continuation of previous post> “poetically and with intensity” Ha as Musical Reactant, cont’d Chemistry I am using — and granted, beating to death — a chemistry metaphor as a convenient and I think appropriate way to report on Tom Harrell’s musical activities in his post-Phil-Woods period (~1990-1995). A musical mixture, like a chemical mixture, is …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, Chemistry and Recognition ii (horns)

<continuation of previous post> “Writing on music is much like dancing on architecture.” Frank Zappa, as cited by Bruno Anastasi Ha as Musical Reactant I have not systematically done the math, but it seems to me Harrell’s activity as accompanist, guest, featured guest, and partner on the (predominantly studio) recordings of others peaked at an …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, The Phil Woods Years – Transition

Contemporary – Harrell as Leader As we reported earlier, Tom Harrell’s contract with Contemporary Records straddled his departure from the Woods Quintet. After Contemporary/GPR Productions’ Sun Dance with George Robert, Harrell made three important albums with Contemporary as leader, all produced by Bill Goodwin. Two of these preceded the final Phil Woods Quintet album (Flash, …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, The Phil Woods Years – Other Activity

(my Trip takes me to Tom Harrell’s substantial output aside from the Woods Quintet during the years 1984-1989, places where I might also expect to find candidate songs for inclusion in my “Horn of Pretty” playlist) Flash, the final Phil Woods Quintet album with Tom Harrell, was recorded in April 1989. The liner notes specify …

Tom Harrell: A Quest. Part 1, The Phil Woods Years – The Phil Woods Quintet

(a continuation of my Trip through Harrell-land in search of a song (or two or three) for inclusion in my “Horn of Pretty” playlist) Quartet + One = Quintet It was late 1983. The great alto saxophonist Phil Woods was wild about Harrell’s playing and desperately wanted to add Harrell to his decade-old Quartet. The …


Other ways to navigate this site:

By category or subcategory:

%d bloggers like this: